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ESQUATZEL HYDRO PROJECT

Pasco, Washington

The Esquatzel hydroelectric project is located on Esquatzel Irrigation Canal, which flows into the Columbia River five miles north of Pasco, Washington. The irrigation system provides agricultural water during the irrigation season, but has year round flow via inflow during the remainder of the year.

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LIME WIND FARM

Huntington, Oregon

Lime Wind Farm is a family owned, 3 megawatt community wind project located in the eastern Oregon town of Huntington, just southeast of La Grande on the Snake River. The wind farm is located on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land, was commissioned in November 2011, and cost $7.2 million to develop. With Hells Canyon and the Idaho border to the east, Lime Wind Farm is one of the first locally-owned megawatt wind farms in Oregon.

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CUMULATIVE WATERSHED IMPACTS OF SMALL-SCALE HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN IRRIGATION DELIVERY SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY

Prepared for Energy Trust of Oregon and Bonneville Environmental Foundation by Les Perkins, Farmers Conservation Alliance (FCA) • June 2013

Hydropower is a complex topic, particularly in the Pacific Northwest. Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) and Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) are interested in the development of low impact small-scale hydropower projects, particularly those that could be incorporated into an existing water distribution system. This case study looks at how these small-scale projects are different from other hydropower projects and also explores what can be expected in terms of impacts on the watersheds where these projects are developed.

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VISOR: VISION TO INTEGRATE SOLAR IN OREGON

July 2013 • By the Oregon Solar Energy Industry Association • Funded in part by BEF

The Oregon Solar Energy Industry Association (OSEIA) saw an opportunity to analyze the rapidly declining price of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in order to display how new pricing improved the overall cost competitiveness of solar when compared to other resource choices. The 2013 study, which was partially funded by BEF, showed several compelling trends: solar prices have dropped so significantly that, when matched with available incentives and the PURPA rates awarded by utilities, solar project developers can now achieve a positive rate of return. Prior to recent cost reductions in solar PV systems, there was little financial incentive to develop new solar projects.

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BRIDGING THE GAP TO FULL DEPLOYMENT OF SMART DR IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST: A GAP ANALYSIS OF END-USE ENERGY STORAGE, DEMAND RESPONSE, AND INTEGRATION OF RENEWABLE ENERGY AT BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

By Bonneville Environmental Foundation

Newly available forms of smart demand response (DR) technologies, referred to here as Smart DR, can provide a cost-effective partial solution to issues presented in the Pacific Northwest’s changing energy landscape. This report outlines the technical, economic, and policy drivers that could lead to high penetration of Smart DR in the Pacific Northwest. It also provides an overview of the gaps that exist between the current state-of-the-art use of Smart DR and the scenario necessary to enable high penetration of Smart DR in this region.

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THE PUBLIC UTILITIES’ GUIDE TO SMALL-SCALE RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS

By Bonneville Environmental Foundation

The interconnection of distributed generation to the utility distribution system can both enhance system performance and create challenges for the utility. The process should minimize potential problems, while taking advantage of the benefits. This guidebook is intended for use by utility staff to streamline the process, aid in identifying key steps involved and identify common problems to avoid.

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THE DEVELOPERS’ GUIDE TO WORKING WITH CONSUMER-OWNED UTILITIES ON SMALL-SCALE RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS

By Bonneville Environmental Foundation

The intricacies of interconnection of distributed generation can be a roadblock for developers. A clear picture of the rules that apply and the steps to follow can facilitate the process. This guidebook is intended to aid small-scale renewable energy developers to clearly identify the applicable rules, timelines, necessary steps and best practices. The guide can also be distributed by utilities to project developers as a way to help educate them about the utility’s rules and timelines.

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A GUIDE TO COMMUNITY SOLAR: UTILITY, PRIVATE AND NONPROFIT PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

By Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development, Keyes and Fox, Stoel Rives and Bonneville Environmental Foundation

In communities across the U.S., people are seeking community-scale alternatives to conventional energy sources—whether to increase energy independence, hedge against rising fuel costs, cut carbon emissions, or provide local jobs. Community organizers, solar energy advocates and government officials alike will find this guide an exceptional resource to address common challenges to the implementation of community-owned solar energy projects.

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SOLAR ELECTRIC GUIDE FOR YOUR STADIUM OR ARENA

A guide to help professional and collegiate sports teams and venues develop successful on-site solar power generation

By Bonneville Environmental Foundation, the Green Sports Alliance and the Natural Resources Defense Council

More than 135 million adults and their families visit 130 professional sports stadiums each year2 to cheer on their team and experience the power of sport. Another 100 million visit nearly 700 major collegiate stadiums and arenas each year to do the same.

In this fully revised Second Edition, professional and collegiate sports teams and venues will find essential guidance to navigate your way through the steps to develop on-site solar power generation for your stadium or arena. Readers will find an accessible list of steps, relevant case studies and tips to succeed.

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WHEN LOCAL SOLUTIONS AREN’T ENOUGH: A STRATEGIC FUNDING PARTNERSHIP TO RESTORE A LARGE RIVER SYSTEM

The Foundation Review 2103, Vol 5:1
By Pam Wiley, M.S., Willamette River Initiative, Meyer Memorial Trust/Tides Center; Ken Bierly, M.S., Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board; and Todd Reeve, M.S., and Kendra Smith, M.S., Bonneville Environmental Foundation

Until recently, however, relatively few grantmakers have entered into formal strategic partnerships with other funders and stakeholders aimed at achieving specific goals and objectives in a defined area of need. Such “collective impact” approaches to catalyzing large-scale social change, as described by Mark Kramer and John Kania in the Winter 2011 issue of the Stanford Social Innovation Review and other publications, have great potential to improve outcomes by aligning stakeholders from philanthropy, nonprofits, business, and government around common priorities, strategies, and measures of success.

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WATER RESTORATION CERTIFICATES: VOLUNTARY, MARKET-BASED FLOW RESTORATION 

The Water Report, September 15, 2010
By Todd Reeve, CEO, Bonneville Environmental Foundation

Across the American West, thousands of miles of streams are chronically dewatered as a result of legal withdrawal of surface water to serve out-of-stream beneficial uses. Efforts are underway in many western states to support voluntary, market-based approaches to restore environmental flows to dewatered streams, rivers and wetlands. However, funding available to support this work is not presently equal to the scale of the task. As one solution, the Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) has launched the Water Restoration Certificate® Program, which is the first nationally marketed, voluntary environmental flow restoration program. BEF provides a collaborative and innovative solution that promises to build a bridge between private sector urban water users and environmental flow restoration needs in the rural West.

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RESTORING THE KOOTENAI RIVER VALLEY

The NW Magazine
By Robin Jenkinson and Todd Reeve

Early European settlers to the Pacific Northwest encountered a landscape teeming with natural bounty. The region’s mountains, streams and forests appeared so vast that many believed a new wave of settlement and industry couldn’t possibly affect the seemingly inexhaustible populations of fish and wildlife. Nevertheless, the settlers brought with them a new land use ethic that fundamentally altered Pacific Northwest ecosystems and disrupted many of the productive habitats that supported abundant fish and game. Although the region’s flora and fauna had coexisted with Native American societies for millennia, in just over 150 years many species would verge on extinction.

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HARNESSING A VOLUNTARY MARKET TO RESTORE FLOW TO DEWATERED RIVERS AND STREAMS

Global Water Forum Discussion Paper 1230, August 2012
By Todd Reeve, CEO, Bonneville Environmental Foundation

This article examines a water restoration certificate scheme that aims to restore flows to dewatered rivers and streams through a voluntary offset market. The author argues that the scheme can provide a stable funding source to secure environmental flows, develop market signals demonstrating the economic value of environmental water, educate the public and encourage policy reform.

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BUILDING SCIENCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY INTO COMMUNITY-BASED RESTORATION: CAN A NEW FUNDING APPROACH FACILITATE EFFECTIVE AND ACCOUNTABLE RESTORATION?

Fisheries.org, January 2006
By Todd Reeve, Jim Lichatowich, William Towey, Angus Duncan

In 2004, the Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) reviewed the results of its first five years of watershed restoration funding in the Pacific Northwest states of Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. We examined completed restoration projects, interviewed watershed managers, and reviewed past project proposals to determine if BEF’s conventional one to two-year grants were promoting accountable, scientific, and watershed-scale restoration. Our evaluation indicated that BEF’s short-term funding was likely to promote site-specific interventions and discourage rigorous, sustained monitoring and a watershed-scale approach. In an effort to advance accountable and increasingly effective restoration, BEF developed and is now applying an experimental long-term funding approach. We present this new approach in order to stimulate discussion and propose an alternate funding policy that might enhance the region’s ability to effect watershed-scale restoration.

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A LONG-TERM, MONITORING-INTENSIVE APPROACH TO PACIFIC NORTHWEST WATERSHED RESTORATION

Ecological Restoration, Volume 25: Issue 1; March 2007
By Todd Reeve, CEO, Bonneville Environmental Foundation

The Pacific Northwest region is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to restore watershed ecosystems and recover diminishing populations of native salmon and trout. However, there is much debate regarding whether current restoration methods are capable of producing desired ecological improvements (runi and others 2002). The scientific community has long advocated that the region establish watershed-scale restoration strategies and apply the monitoring and evaluation systems necessary to facilitate an adaptive, results-based approach (Roper and others 1997). Unfortunately, widespread application of these recommendations has not yet occurred (Bolton and others 2002).

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MOVING TOWARD COMPREHENSIVE RESTORATION: KEY LEARNINGS FROM THE 2012 MODEL WATERSHED PARTNER GATHERING

By Bonneville Environmental Foundation

In the early 2000s, the Bonneville Environmental Foundation (BEF) began to test a new approach to supporting community-based organizations doing watershed restoration around the West. It was in this spirit of making connections and sharing information that BEF convened a gathering of all 16 of the organizations currently participating in the Model Watershed Program. This white paper is a narrative account of the experiences shared by Model Watershed Program participants during the gathering.

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